Tag Archives: Ethernet switch

Comparison of 48 Port PoE Switch Price and Functionality

When it comes to connecting a lot of VoIP phones and IP cameras, a 48 port PoE switch is great for powering them. Whether it is for home use or business use, a 48 port PoE switch can best solve the problems of installing these PoE network devices in places that have no power lines. If you need to know the application of 48 port PoE switch in access and core area, you could read Deploying 48-Port Gigabit PoE Managed Switch in Different Networks. Due to the high capacity and power supply feature, a 48 port PoE switch price is often higher than a standard 48-port Ethernet switch with no PoE. In this post, we will introduce some cheap 48 port PoE switches and do a comparison between them.

48 port PoE switch for VoIP phone IP camera

Comparison of Four 48 Port PoE Switch Price and Function

The four 48 port PoE switches that we’re going to discuss are UniFi US-48-500W, TP-Link T1600G-52PS, D-Link DGS-1210-52MP/ME and FS S1600-48T4S. They are inexpensive compared with most enterprise class 48 port PoE switches. Let’s have a look at these switches.

Difference Between the Four 48 Port PoE Switches

The table below gives some basic parameters of these four switches, including the port type, supported data rate, the maximum PoE power consumption, switching capacity and forwarding rate.

Switch Model UniFi US-48-500W TP-Link T1600G-52PS D-Link DGS-1210-52MP/ME FS S1600-48T4S
10/100/1000Mbps RJ45 Ports 48 48 48 48
Gigabit SFP Ports 2 4 4 0
SFP+ Ports 2 0 0 4
Max. PoE Power Consumption 500 W 470.4 W 479.5 W 600 W
Max. Power Per Port (PoE+) 30 W 30 W 30 W (ports 1-8) 30 W
Switching Capacity 140 Gbps 104 Gbps 104 Gbps 180 Gbps
Forwarding Rate 104.16 Mpps 77.4 Mpps 77.4 Mpps 130.94 Mpps
Price US$760.00 to US$1,230.90 US$481.99 to US$725.99 US$988.06 to US$1,028.01 US$689.00

The UniFi US-48-500W is a 48-port Layer 2 access switch. In addition to 48 Gigabit RJ45 ports, it has 2 fiber ports of Gigabit SFP and 2 fiber ports of 10G SFP+. It has a non-blocking throughout of 70 Gbps, which is sufficient for typical home use and most small business use. But compared with the other three 48-port PoE switches, it lacks some Layer 3 features. The other three are Layer 2+ switches that support static routing and access resolution protocol (ARP) inspecting, which are simple but efficient approaches in segmenting and securing the network.

Outwardly, the TP-Link T1600G-52PS and D-Link DGS-1210-52MP/ME are similar in many aspects. They both have 4 Gigabit SFP ports and their switch fabric capacity and forwarding rate are identical. However, the 48 RJ45 ports of T1600G-52PS are all IEEE 802.3at/af-compliant PoE+ ports, while the 48 RJ45 ports of DGS-1210-52MP/ME are not. Only ports 1-8 are PoE+ and the ports 9-48 are PoE. The price of T1600G-52PS is much lower than DGS-1210-52PS but the former one is released in 2015 while the latter one is 2017’s new model. Both T1600G-52PS and DGS-121052MP/ME has no 10G ability.

Obviously, the switching capacity (or backplane bandwidth) and forwarding rate of the FS S1600-48T4S are the highest among these four switches. It has four 10G uplink ports, which allows large traffic from the access switch to the core switch and ensures high speed and precise transmission and recording without delay. Meanwhile, it supports the largest power to the device, which is suitable for connecting more PoE network devices. This 48 port PoE switch price is lower than two of the other switches.

48-Port PoE Switch Price

Common Benefits and Features of the Four 48-Port PoE Switches

These four 48 port PoE switch price are much lower than that of high-end PoE switches. They are all managed PoE switches equipped with 48 10/100/1000Mbps Rj45 ports of auto-sensing IEEE 802.3af (PoE), which provides a maximum per PoE port output power to each device of 15.4 W. They also support IEEE 802.3at (PoE+), which enhanced the max. per port power consumption to 30 W. All of them have been equipped with fiber uplink ports.

Another common feature is that these four 48 port PoE switches all support easy management. And the managing function is not limited to only one type. They all have an RJ45 console port or a serial port for managing through web-based graphical user interface (GUI, IPv4/IPv6) or command line interface (CLI).

Summary

This post has compared the 48 port PoE switch price and function. They are generally inexpensive and suitable for both home use and business use. The managing functions are simplified compared with high-end switches, in order to help better management of the network. If you want 10G uplink, UniFi US-48-500W or FS S1600-48T4S are recommended. Before purchasing a 48 port PoE switch, be sure to check the power requirement for your total PoE devices, the standard it complies to and the overall PoE budget of your installation.

Related Article: Deploying 48-Port Gigabit PoE Managed Switch in Different Networks

Wireless Network vs. Wired Network: Which One to Choose?

Our home networks rely on either wired (Ethernet) or wireless technology. Sometimes, we use both of them, especially when multiple Internet capable devices are set up in homes. Wireless networks enable multiple devices to use the same internet connection remotely, as well as share files and other resources. But it’s still hard to say wireless is better than wired, since each one has advantages and drawbacks. This article is meant to compare wireless and wired technology from three primary factors: mobility, reliability, and security.

wireless network anywhere

Wireless Network vs. Wired Network

wired network vs wireless network

Mobility

A wired LAN (Local Area Network) uses Ethernet cables to connect computers together directly or more commonly, through a hub, switch, or router. Wired connections typically cost much less and reduce battery drain on laptops and other mobile devices because Wi-Fi adapters use more power.

As for wireless network, users can move around freely within the area of the network with their laptops, handheld devices etc and get an internet connection. The popularity of Wi-Fi has also increased due to increased smartphone and tablet sales. Many of these devices are not capable of wired Ethernet connections and rely on wireless signals for Internet connectivity.

Reliability

Ethernet-based(wired) networks tend to be much more reliable than wireless networks. The backbone of any network relies on an Ethernet connection. The most common problem with wired network is loose cable connections. Because you have to lay lots of cables and put them through walls etc. A bundle of tangled wires can result in damage and performance degradation. Using Zip-Ties is an excellent way to keep cables out of the way and tangle-free.

For the most part, wireless technology is reliable. There are some concerns about interference from home appliances such as microwaves and cordless phones, but most wireless routers provide multiple channels that can mitigate this concern relatively easily.

Security

The security of a home-based Ethernet network is almost primarily dependent upon a firewall. Most broadband routers include a firewall already and software firewalls can also be installed on individual machines. Unlike wireless networks that broadcast data through the air, all data packets in a wired network safely travel through Ethernet cables. As long as the router is protected from intrusion using a firewall, your wired home network is safe.

The mobility of wireless networks is overshadowed in some respects by the lower security inherent to wireless. An unsecured wireless network can easily be compromised by a hacker or identity thief looking to intercept private information traveling through your wireless network. Although these risks are very real, many of them can be avoided with proper network installation. For example, using a secure password for logging into the wireless network. Although this does not make a wireless router completely safe, it certainly reduces the likelihood of unwanted guests gaining access to your information.

Summary of The Advantages and Disadvantages

Activity/Category Wireless Network Wired Network
Freedom of movement for users Users can access network from anywhere within range Users location limited by need to use cable and/or connect to a port
Sharing Files Easier with wireless network as you do not need to be cabled to network, though transfer speeds may be slower Generally less convenient as you have to be cabled in, but transfer speeds often faster
Cables Far less complicated, disruptive, and untidy cabling needed Lots of cables and ports needed which can be a headache
Business For businesses dealing with public, customers like and often expect wireless, so wireless can increase income Wired networks are not convenient for public use, but sometimes acceptable for a traditional office
Connection speeds Usually slower than wired Usually faster than wireless
Security Less secure than wired. Both bandwidth and information can sometimes be accessed More secure than wireless
Set up Upgrading to a wireless network can be difficult and expensive Can also be difficult and expensive to set up

Conclusion

Here, we do not mean to abandon one over the other. A good home network will often have both wireless and wired components. Ethernet connections are great for high-speed transfers on desktops or other devices that do not move. Your smart phone, tablet, or laptop will benefit from a wireless network that has been properly configured to ensure a secure browsing experience. Whether you choose a wired or wireless network, or a combination of the two, take time to configure it properly and add a firewall to protect your privacy and the integrity of your network while enjoying the benefits afforded by both technologies. If you need any Ethernet cables for wired network, or cost-effective Ethernet switches for wireless network, just give FS.COM a shot. For more information, please visit www.fs.com.