Why Should Choose Managed Switch Over Unmanged Switch?

Before we talk about managed and unmanaged switch, we should first and foremost figure out what a switch is. Switches are boxes that connect a number of other devices together on a Local Area Network (LAN) and utilize what is called packet switching to effectively forward data to and from connections. Generally, There are two types of switch—managed and unmanaged switch. Here we will discuss the differences between the two types and why managed switch is recommended.

What Is the Difference Between Manged Switch and Unmanaged Switch?

An unmanaged switch on the other hand behaves like a “plug and play” device. It cannot be configured and simply allows the devices to communicate with one another. They tend to be less expensive than managed switches, as they have lower capacity and less flexibility. Generally, they don’t see much use outside of smaller and less intensive networking environments. Managed switches are fully configurable, and can be monitored and adjusted at your discretion. Although the management method and degree of configuration varies, they are typically more expensive than unmanaged switches, but offer much greater flexibility.

difference between managed switch and unmanaged switch

Why Should Choose Managed Switch Over Unmanged Switch?

There are several reasons why a managed switch is recommended.

48 Ports Managed Business Gigabit PoE+ Switch

Remote Access/Control

Managed switches give you better control over your LAN traffic and offer advanced features to control the traffic. Managed switches have all the features of an unmanaged switch and additionally have the ability to configure, manage, and monitor your LAN. So this helps you to monitor and decide who should have access to your network and gives you greater control over data flow through your network.

Security

With a managed switch you can secure your network connections and also protect any unused ports on your switch. For example, if there is an unused port on your managed switch, you can disable that port or even apply MAC address filtering so as not to allow unauthorised users or devices to access the network by just plugging in. Managed switches also require additional authentication through password protection of the network.

Redundancy

Redundancy means to provide an alternate data path to network traffic to safeguard a network in case a connection or cable fails. Managed switches incorporate Spanning Tree Protocol or STP to provide path redundancy in the network. This provides redundant paths but prevents loops that are created by multiple active paths between switches. STP allows one active path at a time between two network devices, prevents loops, and establishes redundant links as backups so that there is lesser downtime. This makes job for a network administrator easier and also proves more profitable for a business.

Quality of Service (QoS)

The Quality of Service (QoS) feature of a managed switch also allows you to prioritize your network traffic by assigning a higher priority to the critical traffic. This helps to improve network performance and helps in better transmission of delay-sensitive data such as real-time voice. So by assigning highest priority to voice data you can ensure the voice packets don’t get dropped or delayed and mangled during transmission and you can hear crystal clear voice during a conversation.

Port Mirroring

Port mirroring is a feature used on managed switches which helps to diagnose network problems. A Managed Switch allows you to configure Port Mirroring to send copies of traffic to a single port on the same switch for analysis by a network analyser. The network analyser then allows you to diagnose and fix problems without taking the network out of service, reducing downtime.

Conclusion

A managed switch is more intelligent and offers more control, flexibility, and features, some you may not even know you need. So if you are still undecided between an unmanaged and a managed switch, then please do not hesitate in getting in touch with FS.COM. We will be more than happy to help with your networking needs.

Layer 3 Switch VS. Router: Which to Choose?

Speaking of layer 3 switch and router, everyone may be confused about the two terms, because they both take IP packets, examine the destination address and pass the packet according to routing rules. It seems that layer 3 switch is identical to a router in this way. Actually, they do have some difference not only in function, but also other aspects. This article will explain how they differ from each other and a better option will be suggested for your reference.

Basics About Layer 3 Switch and Router

In general, a Layer 3 switch (routing switch) is primarily a switch (a Layer-2 device) that has been enhanced or taught some routing (Layer 3) capabilities and it was conceived as a technology to improve on the performance of routers used in large local area networks (LANs) like corporate intranets.

A router is a Layer-3 device that simply does routing only. In the case of a switching router, it is primarily a router that may use switching technology (high-speed ASICs) for speed and performance (as well as also supporting Layer-2 bridging functions).

Comparison Between Layer 3 Switch and Router

Layer 3 Switch VS. Router

Performance versus cost—Layer 3 switches are much more cost effective than routers for delivering high-speed interVLAN routing. High performance routers are typically much more expensive than Layer 3 switches.

Port density—Layer 3 switches, have more higher port count. Routers on the other hand typically have a much lower port density.

Flexibility—Layer 3 switches allow you to mix and match Layer 2 and Layer 3 switching, which means that you can configure a Layer 3 switch to operate as a normal Layer 2 switch, or enable Layer 3 switching as required.

WAN technologies support—Layer 3 Switch is limited to usage over LAN environment where Inter VLAN routing can be performed. However, when it comes to working on WAN and edge technologies, Layer 3 Switch lags behind. Router is the front runner in such scenario where WAN technologies such as Frame Relay or ATM need to be fostered.

Hardware/Software decision making—The key difference between Layer 3 switches and routers lies in the hardware technology used to build the unit. The hardware inside a Layer 3 switch merges that of traditional switches and routers, replacing some of a router’s software logic with hardware to offer better performance in some situations.

Layer 3 Switch & Router: When and Where to Use

Now let’s look into the scenarios when should Layer 3 switch or router be used.

When A Layer 3 Switch is needed?

1. If you need to connect your Hub rooms and make a L3 decision and more Ethernet interfaces are required for direct server form connectivity, then you can use a switch.

2. If you need to connect your inter-offices via l2 circuits by the ISP you can directly terminate the link on the switch and configure routing on the same.

3. If you need more through-put and direct access and interVLAN communication, switch is the best option.

When A Router is Needed?

1. If you are connecting an ISP directly to provide internet, then router is the box you need to deploy.

2. If you need to build tunnels between your offices (connecting 2 offices over public internet securely ), then you need a router.

3. If you are a CE participating in MPLS configuration, then you need a router.

Conclusion

Having explained the mechanism of both a router and a Layer 3 switch, I guess you’ve already have an understanding of them. Simply put, they perform the same function but each have pro’s and con’s as to limitations. Generally, Layer 3 switches are primarily used in the LAN environment, where you need routing. Routers are used in the WAN environment. These days lots of people have started using layer 3 switches in WAN environment, like MPLS. If you are looking for switches or any fiber optic cables and optical transceivers for switches, take FS.COM as a consideration. Or if you have any question about your network deployment, feel free to contact tech@fs.com for help.

What Kind of Switches and Patch Cables Should I Choose for SFP Transceiver?

Gigabit Ethernet has supplanted Fast Ethernet in wired local networks and becomes ubiquitous throughout the world, serving as one of the most prevalent enterprise communication standard. The Gigabit Ethernet standard supports a maximum data rate of 1 gigabit per second (Gbps)(1000 Mbps), 10 times faster than Fast Ethernet, yet is compatible with existing Ethernet. To link your switches and routers to a Gigabit Ethernet network, you need a Gigabit Ethernet transceiver as a transmission medium. This article intends to introduce the most commonly used one—SFP transceivers.

sfp

What Is SFP Transceiver?

SFP, short for small form-factor pluggable is a compact, hot-pluggable transceiver used for both telecommunication and data communications applications. SFP transceiver can be regarded as the upgrade version of GBIC module. Unlike GBIC with SC fiber optic interface, SFP module is with LC interface and the main body size of SFP is only about half of GBIC so that it can save more space. SFP interfaces a network device mother board (for a router, switch, media converter or similar devices) to a fiber optic or copper networking cable. It is designed to support SONET, Gigabit Ethernet, Fibre Channel, and other communications standards.

Types & Applications of SFP transceivers

SFP transceivers are available with various transmitter and receiver types, which facilitates users to select the appropriate optical transceiver for different optical reach and optical fiber type (single-mode fiber or multimode fiber) required by different link. SFP transceiver modules can be divided into several different categories:

Types Transmission Medium Wavelength Distance
1000BASE-T SFP Twisted-pair cabling / 100 m
1000BASE-SX SFP Multimode fiber 770-860 nm OM1-275 m/OM2-550 m
1000BASE-LX/LH SFP SMF & MMF 1270-1355 nm MMF-550 m/SMF-5 km
1000BASE-ZX SFP Single mode fiber 1550 nm 70 km
1000BASE-EX SFP Single mode fiber 1310 nm 40 km
1000BASE-BX10 SFP Single mode fiber 1480-1500 nm downstream, 1260-1,360 nm upstream 10 km
CWDM and DWDM SFP Single optical fiber various wavelengths various maximum distances

SFP transceivers are found in Ethernet switches, routers, firewalls and network interface cards. Storage interface cards, also called HBAs or Fibre Channel storage switches, also make use of these modules. Because of their low cost, low profile, and ability to provide a connection to different types of optical fiber, SFP transceiver provides such equipment with enhanced flexibility.

FS.COM Compatible SFP Transceivers for Popular Switches

FS.COM offers a full range of SFP transceivers compatible with major brands, such as Cisco, Juniper, Arista, Brocade, HPE, etc. All of these cost-effective compatible SFPs have been strictly tested to make sure 100% compatibility. The table below listed a small part of compatible SFPs supported on major branded switches.

Brand Switch Series Model Port Description
Cisco Catalyst 6500 Series WS-SUP720-3BXL 2 SFP Port
VS-S720-10G-3C 4 SFP Port
WS-X6724-SFP 24 SFP Port
Nexus 9000 Series N9K-C9396PX 48 SFP Port
IE3010 Series IE-3010-24TC 2 SFP Port
ASR 9000 Series Router A9K-MPA-20X1GE 20 SFP Port
Juniper EX 4200 Series EX4200-24T 2 SFP Port
EX4200-48T 4 SFP Port
EX4200-24T-DC 2 SFP Port
MX480 Router MX480 Router 4 SFP Port
SRX Series SRX210 1 SFP Port (Option)
QFX 5100 QFX5100-48S 48 SFP Port
Arista 7500 Series DCS-7504 48 SFP Port (Option)
DCS-7508 48 SFP Port (Option)
7050SX Series 7050SX-64 48 SFP Port
7100 Series DCS-7124S 24 SFP Port
Brocade VDX 6720 BR-VDX6720-16-R 16 SFP Port
BR-VDX6720-24-F 24 SFP Port
BR-VDX6720-40-F 40 SFP Port
SX Series SX-424F 24 SFP Port
SX-FI12GM-4-PREM 12 SFP Port
Brocade BI-RX-8 NI-MLX-1Gx20-SFP 20 SFP Port
HPE ProCurve 5400zl Series J8697A 2 SFP Port
J9548A 144 SFP Port
FlexFabric 5800 Series JC101B 4 SFP Port
JG225B 6 SFP Port
5400R zl2 Series J9584A 24 SFP Port
StorageWorks edge 2/12 348406-B21 12 SFP Port

FS.COM Patch Cables for SFP Transceivers

FS.COM offers comprehensive fiber patch cables for common and special types of SFPs, including singlemode & multimode, simplex & duplex, UPC & APC, lengths from 1 meter to 30 meters in large stocks. We also provides Cat 5e patch cables for 10/100/1000BASE-T SFPs.

Fiber Mode Connector Jacket
9/125 SMF LC Duplex PVC/LSZH/OFNP
9/125 SMF LC Simplex PVC/LSZH
9/125 SMF SC Simplex PVC/LSZH
50/125 OM2 LC Duplex PVC/LSZH
62.5/125 OM1 LC Duplex PVC
Cat5e Patch Cables Max Distance Data Rate
Unshielded (UTP) 100m 1000Mbps
Shielded (FTP) 100m 1000Mbps

Summary

This article offers switch and fiber patch cabling solution for SFP transceivers. Besides the major brands mentioned above, we also provide SFP transceivers compatible with other brands, such as Dell, Extreme, H3C, Huawei, Intel, IBM, Netgear, Ciena, D-Link, Avago, and so on. As to special requirements, please contact Sales@fs.com for suggestion.

25GbE–A New Trend For Future Ethernet Network

Nowadays, the requirement for bandwidth in cloud data centers is increasing strikingly. To meet the demand for higher bandwidth, networking and the Ethernet industry are moving toward a new direction. Discussions previously focusing on 10GbE and 40GbE are now shifting onto 25GbE. It seems that 25GbE is more preferred and accepted by end users, which poses a threat to 10GbE and 40GbE. Why does it happen? This post will lead you to interpret 25GbE in an all-sided perspective.

25GbE–A New Trend for Future Ethernet Network

25GbE—An Emerging Standard

25GbE is a standard developed by IEEE 802.3 Task Force P802.3by in July 2014, used for Ethernet servers and switches connectivity in a data center environment. The single lane design of 25GbE gives it a low cost per bit, which enables cloud providers and large-scale data center operators to deploy fewer switches and cables to meet the needs while still scaling their network infrastructure. The following table provides a summary of key upcoming IEEE standard interfaces that specify 25GbE.

25GbE–A New Trend for Future Ethernet Network

Figure 1: IEEE 802.3 standard Interfaces that specify 25GbE

Cloud Will Drive to QSFP28 and SFP28

The 25GbE physical interface specification supports two main form factors—SFP28 and QSFP28.
SFP28 is used for a single 25GbE port. The SFP28-25G-SR-S is an 850nm VCSEL 25GbE transceiver which is designed to transmit and receive optical data over 50/125µm multimode fiber (MMF) and support up to 70m on OM3 MMF and 100m on OM4 MMF.

The QSFP28 transceiver and interconnect cable is a high-density, high-speed product solution designed for applications in the telecommunication. The interconnect offers four channels of high-speed signals with data rates ranging from 25 Gbps up to potentially 40 Gbps, and will meet 100 Gbps Ethernet (4×25 Gbps) and 100 Gbps 4X InfiniBand EDR requirements.

100GBASE-SR4-with-four-25GBASE-SR-SFP28

Figure 2: FS.COM optical transceivers for 25GbE solution

Why Choose 25GbE

While 10GbE is fine for many existing deployments, it cannot efficiently deliver the bandwidth required by next-generation cloud and web-scale environments. And 40GbE isn’t cost-effective or power-efficient in ToR switching for cloud providers. Thus, 25GbE was designed to break through the dilemma.

Number of SerDes Lanes

SerDes is an integrated circuit or transceiver used in high-speed communications for converting serial data to parallel interfaces and vice versa. The transmitter section is a serial-to-parallel converter, and the receiver section is opposite. Currently, the rate of SerDes is 25 Gbps. That is to say, we can only use one SerDes lane at the speed of 25 Gbps to connect from 25GbE card to the other end of 25GbE card. In contrast, 40GbE needs four 10GbE SerDes lanes to achieve connection. As a result, the communication between two 40GbE cards requires as many as four pairs of fiber. Furthermore, 25 Gbps Ethernet provides an easy upgrade path to 50GbE and 100GbE networks, which utilize multiple 25GbE lanes.

Numbers of lanes needed in different Gigabit Ethernet

Figure 3: Numbers of lanes needed in different Gigabit Ethernet

Utilization of PCIe Lanes

At present, the mainstream Intel Xeon CPU only provides 40 lanes of PCIe 3.0. The lane bandwidth of a single PCIe 3.0 is about 8 Gbps. These PCle lanes are used for many connections. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the utilization of limited PCIe lanes by the network cards. Single 40GbE NIC needs at least one PCIe 3.0 x8 slot, so two 40GbE cards need to occupy two PCIe 3.0 x8 lanes. Even if the two 40GbE ports can run full of data at the same time, the actual lane bandwidth utilization is only: (40G+40G) / 8G*16= 62.5%. On the contrary, 25GbE card only needs one PCIe 3.0 x8 lane, and then the utilization efficiency is 25G*2 / (8G*8) = 78%. Apparently, 25GbE is significantly more efficient and more flexible than 40GbE in terms of the use of PCIe lanes.

10GbE vs 25GbE vs 40GbE

25GbE enables resellers and their customers to provide 2.5X the performance of 10GbE, making it a cost-effective upgrade to the 10GbE infrastructure. Since 25GbE is delivered across a single lane, it provides greater switch port density and network scalability compared to 40GbE, which is actually four 10GbE lanes. Thus, it costs less, requires lower power consumption and provides higher bandwidth. What’s more, 25GbE can run over existing fiber optic cable plant designed for 10, 50 or 100GbE and also 40GbE by changing the transceivers.

Bandwidth comparison for 25GbE and other Ethernet speeds

Figure 4: Bandwidth comparison for 25GbE and other Ethernet speeds

Summary

No matter the market research or the attitude of users, 25GbE seems to be the preferred option down the road. Actually, coming back to reality, there will be a significant increase in 100GbE and 25GbE port density in the next few years. If you need any optics and cabling solution for your 25GbE infrastructure, feel free to contact sales@fs.com.

Five Basics About Fiber Optic Cable

A fiber optic cable is a network cable that contains strands of glass fibers inside an insulated casing. They’re designed for high performance data networking and telecommunications. Fiber optic cable carry communication signals using pulses of light, faster than copper cabling which uses electricity. They are becoming the most significant communication media in data center. Then how much do you know about them? This post serves as a guide for beginners.

Fiber Components

The three basic elements of a fiber optic cable are the core, cladding and coating. Core is the light transmission area of the fiber, either glass or plastic. The larger the core, the more light that will be transmitted into the fiber. The function of the cladding is to provide a lower refractive index at the core interface, causing reflection within the core. Therefore the light waves can be transmitted through the fiber. Coatings are usually multi-layers of plastics applied to preserve fiber strength, absorb shock and provide extra fiber protection.

Fiber Components

Fiber Type

Generally, there are two basic types of fiber optic cables: single mode fiber (SMF) and multimode fiber (MMF). Furthermore, multimode fiber cores may be either step index or graded index.

Single mode and multi-mode fiber-optic cables

Single mode optical fiber is a single strand of glass fiber with a diameter of 8.3 to 10 microns that has one mode of transmission. The index of refraction between the core and the cladding changes less than it does for multimode fibers. Light thus travels parallel to the axis, creating little pulse dispersion. It’s often used for long-distance signal transmission.

Step index multimode fiber has a large core, up to 100 microns in diameter. As a result, some of the light rays that make up the digital pulse may travel a direct route, whereas others zigzag as they bounce off the cladding. These alternative pathways cause the different groupings of light rays to arrive separately at a receiving point. Consequently, this type of fiber is best suited for transmission over short distances.

Graded index fibers are commercially available with core diameters of 50, 62.5 and 100 microns. It contains a core in which the refractive index diminishes gradually from the center axis out toward the cladding. The higher refractive index at the center makes the light rays moving down the axis advance more slowly than those near the cladding.

Fiber Size

Single mode fibers usually has a 9 micron core and a 125 micron cladding (9/125µm). Multimode fibers originally came in several sizes, optimized for various networks and sources, but the data industry standardized on 62.5 core fiber in the mid-80s (62.5/125 fiber has a 62.5 micron core and a 125 micron cladding. It’s now called OM1). Recently, as gigabit and 10 gigabit networks have become widely used, an old fiber design has been upgraded. 50/125 fiber was used from the late 70s with lasers for telecom applications. 50/125 fiber (OM2) offers higher bandwidth with the laser sources used in the gigabit LANs and can allow gigabit links to go longer distances. Laser-optimized 50/125 fiber (OM3 or OM4) today is considered by most to be the best choice for multimode applications.

Basic Cable Design

The two basic cable designs are loose-tube cable, used in the majority of outside plant installations, and tight-buffered cable, primarily used inside buildings.

loose-tube-or-tight-buffered-cable

The modular design of loose-tube cables typically holds up to 12 fibers per buffer tube with a maximum per cable fiber count of more than 200 fibers. Loose-tube cables can be all dielectric or optionally armored. The modular buffer-tube design permits easy drop-off of groups of fibers at intermediate points, without interfering with other protected buffer tubes being routed to other locations.

Tight-buffered cables can be divided into single fiber tight-buffered cables and multi-fiber tight-buffered cables. single fiber tight-buffered cables are used as pigtails, patch cords and jumpers to terminate loose-tube cables directly into opto-electronic transmitters, receivers and other active and passive components. While multi-fiber tight-buffered cables also are available and are used primarily for alternative routing and handling flexibility and ease within buildings.

Connector Type

While there are many different types of fiber connectors, they share similar design characteristics. Simplex vs. duplex: Simplex means 1 connector per end while duplex means 2 connectors per end. The following picture shows various connector styles as well as characteristics.

fiber cable connectors

Summary

Ultimately, what we’ve discussed is only the tip of the iceberg. If you are eager to know more about the fiber optic cable, either basics, applications or purchasing, please visit www.fs.com for more information.

FS UPS–Save Your Power

Imagine that you are working overnight for a project planning on your computer, and all of a sudden, you see a blank screen due to power cut. And what’s worse, all of your documents, important data and information are lost, and all of your efforts are in vain. It does sound like a devastating tragedy, right? However, with FS UPS power supply, you won’t worry about the issue of lost information. You can still move on with your work even if there is a power blackout. Why it’s so magic? Let’s check it out.

Power System On-Line Single-Phase 1kVA 800W Double-Conversion UPS

Three Operational Modes of UPS System

An uninterruptible power supply, also known as uninterruptible power source, UPS or battery/flywheel backup, is an electrical apparatus that provides emergency power to a load when the input power source or mains power fails. A modern UPS system has three general categories: on-line, line-interactive and standby/offline.

A standby/offline UPS charges its battery and then waits for the mains power to drop off. When that happens, the Standby UPS mechanically switches to the battery backup. This switch over takes about 20-100 milliseconds, which is generally well within the tolerance threshold of most electronics.

A line-interactive UPS has a similar design to a standby UPS, but includes a special transformer. This special transformer makes line-interactive UPS better at handling brownouts and power sags without consuming the limited reserve battery power.

An online UPS completely isolates the devices attached to it from the wall power. Instead of jumping into action at the first sign of power cut or voltage regulation issues like the standby and line-interactive UPS, the online UPS continuously filters the wall power through the battery system.

When A UPS is Needed

UPS power supply can not only solve the problem of power outages, but also the following power quality problems.

1.Power surge—The effective value of the output voltage is 110% higher than the rated value and such condition lasts for one or more cycles.

2.High voltage spike—A voltage with a peak value of 6000V and duration from 1/10000 second to 1/2 cycles (10ms).

3.Switching transient—An impulse voltage whose peak voltage reaches up to 20000V, but duration sustains within millionth of a second to one in ten thousand second.

4. Power sags—It refers to a low voltage state whose mains voltage is between 80% and 85% of the rated value, and lasts for one to several cycles.

5. Electrical line noise—It refers to Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), Electromagnetic Interference (EFI) and other kinds of high frequency interference.

6. Frequency variation—The change of mains voltage frequency exceeds more than 3Hz.

7. Brownout—The effective value of the mains voltage is continuously below the rated value for a long time.

8. Power fail—The interruption of the power supply and lasts for at least two cycles to several hours.

What Kind of UPS Can FS Offer

FS mainly deals with online UPS, including one-phrase and three-phrase type. FS online UPS always provides power from the battery, so the load always gets clean power regardless of any power problems. Therefore, FS online UPS is recommended for sensitive and critical electronic devices. The online UPSs offered by FS act as advanced power managers, ensuring the availability of an uninterrupted power supply to protect hardware (such as computers, data centers, telecommunication equipment or other electrical equipment) and mission critical applications. As is shown in the picture below, FS online UPS can be divided into eight parts and each of them has its unique function.

FS online UPS

Summary

High-quality UPS plays an important role in safeguarding against many potential energy issues. If you are investigating the best system for your own requirements, speak to one of our technical specialists who will be able to provide free advice on the most appropriate solution. Feel free to contact us via tech@fs.com.

Cisco Catalyst 9000 Series Switches: What’s New?

Recently, Cisco unveiled the Catalyst 9000 family, shaping the new era of intent-based networking. The Network. Intuitive. The Cisco Catalyst 9000 Series switches are the next generation of enterprise-class switches built for security, Internet of Things (IoT), mobility, and cloud. These switches form the foundational building block for Cisco Software Defined Access (SD-Access). And what’s more, they also support full IEEE 802.3at Power over Ethernet Plus (PoE+), and Universal Power over Ethernet (UPoE). These switches enhance productivity by enabling applications such as IP telephony, wireless, IoT, and video for a true borderless network experience. This post will take a closer look at Catalyst 9000 switches and some highlights of them.

Members of the Cisco Catalyst 9000 Family

The Cisco Catalyst 9000 Series switches come in three main varieties.

Members of the Cisco Catalyst 9000 Family

  • The Catalyst 9300 is top fixed-access enterprise network switch series, stacking to 480Gbps. The Cisco Catalyst 9300 switches feature a fixed number of switch ports (1G 48-port, 1G 24-port, or 24 ports of 1G/2.5G/5G/10G).
  • The Cisco Catalyst 9400 is the leading modular-access switches for enterprise, which can support up to 9Tbps. It features 7-slot and 10-slot variety.
  • The Catalyst 9500 is the industry’s first fixed-core 40Gbps switch for the enterprise. It comes in three different varieties, a 24 port 40G switch, a 12 port 40G switch, and a 40 port 10G switch with 10/40G uplinks. The Cisco Catalyst 9500 is meant for distribution and core use.
New Design

The Catalyst 9000 series have some special design choices, which make Catalyst 9000 the industry’s most aesthetic switches.

  • Rounded frame without sharp corners, changing the traditional switch outline.
  • Ergonomic pullout handles on the Catalyst 9400 enable better weight distribution. You don’t have to carry it on your back or worry about breaking your back when lifting these switches!
  • Innovative slide-out ejectors with latch on the uplink modules of Catalyst 9500. Screwdrivers can be abandoned!
  • Molded plastic covers ejectors, screws and handles on field replaceable units. Gloves are needless!
  • Industry standard icons now advertise the capabilities of the switch–a truly universal switch!
  • The Catalyst 9400 chassis introduces user-configurable dual serviceable fan-tray design, allowing users to service the same fan-tray from the front and rear of the chassis.
  • The Catalyst 9300 Series switches support a blue beacon LED for easy identification of the switch being accessed.

new design choices

New Software

The new Cisco Catalyst 9000 switches use an Intel x86 processor to help create a network that constantly learns and adapts. Above the feature, Cisco adopts a central software console called the Cisco Digital Network Architecture (DNA) Center that replaced the obsolescent and deprecated command-line interface (CLI). DNA is about bringing the power of automation, ease of management, and predictable performance to networks while driving down cost.

New Packaging

The Catalyst 9300 Series introduces new licensing packaging: Network Essentials and Network Advantage, which feature vastly simplified base network packages. Additionally, there are two licensing levels for Cisco DNA, namely Cisco DNA Essentials and Cisco DNA Advantage, which are hardware and term-based software packages used as mandatory add-ons. In addition to on-box capabilities, the Cisco DNA packages unlock additional functionality in Cisco DNA Center (in APIC-EM), enabling controller-based software-defined automation in your network. License consumption is further simplified with the package combinations of Essentials and Advantage.

Transceiver Options for The Catalyst 9000

The following diagram lists the supporting detailed transceiver options for Catalyst 9300 Series. Take C9300-NM-4G as an example, this module has four 1G SFP module slots. Any combination of standard SFP modules are supported.

Model ID Description
11773 Cisco GLC-T Compatible 1000BASE-T SFP Copper RJ-45 100m Transceiver
34976 Cisco GLC-TA Compatible 10/100/1000BASE-T SFP Copper RJ-45 100m Transceiver
12622 Cisco SFP-GE-L Compatible 1000BASE-LX/LH SFP 1310nm 10km DOM Transceiver
48928 Cisco SFP-GE-S-2 Compatible 1000BASE-SX SFP 1310nm 2km DOM Transceiver
39297 Cisco GLC-TE Compatible 1000BASE-T SFP Copper RJ-45 100m Transceiver
15413 Cisco Linksys MGBT1 Compatible 1000BASE-T SFP Copper RJ-45 100m Transceiver
12624 Cisco SFP-GE-Z Compatible 1000BASE-ZX SFP 1550nm 80km DOM Transceiver
39370 Cisco Meraki MA-SFP-1GB-SX Compatible 1000BASE-SX SFP 850nm 550m DOM Transceiver
28299 Cisco ONS-SE-ZE-EL Compatible 10/100/1000BASE-T SFP Copper RJ-45 100m Transceiver


Summary

The Catalyst 9000 Family solves some persistent challenges of enterprise networks by utilizing platform innovations built around four key areas: security, Internet of Things (IoT) convergence, mobility and cloud readiness. There is no doubt that Catalyst 9000 is leading us to a new era of faster and securer network. And if you need any transceiver or cables for mating Cisco Catalyst 9000 series, please contact us via sales@fs.com. All the products offered by FS.COM are tested before shipping to ensure superior quality.

FS Polarity Switchable LC Uniboot Cable: Leading Trend in Fiber Optics

The data center is moving towards high speed and high density. How to build more optical fiber cables in limited space is becoming increasingly severe. In this case, FS.COM introduced a new-type product suitable for high density cabling requirement—polarity switchable LC uniboot cable. It’s the preferred option for high density data center connection today. Its largest feature is switchable polarity, designed to eliminate the need for dual zip cords and reduce overall bulk cabling by 50%. But do you know about polarity switchable LC uniboot cable? What are the features of it and how to reverse the polarity? You may find answer in this post.

Introduction to LC Uniboot Fiber Patch Cable

LC uniboot fiber patch cables are designed for high density applications in data center environment. Generally, the LC uniboot patch cord is designed with a polarization method that can help users easily reverse the fiber polarity. In addition, the LC uniboot fiber patch cable can reduce cable management space comparing to standard patch cord as it places both simplex fibers into one jacket while still terminating into a duplex LC connector. Similar to the standard patch cord, single-mode and multimode versions are available in LC uniboot patch cables.

FS Polarity Switchable LC Uniboot Cable

Features & Advantages

FS polarity switchable LC uniboot cables feature high density. They are used to connect switches or network devices in fiber networks directly or interconnect structured cabling systems in a fiber network. Besides, FS uniboot fiber patch cable has the following highlights.

  • Easy polarity reversal: Polarity changes can be made in the field quickly, without the use of tools, to the correct fiber mapping polarity.
  • “All in One” international quality cable assemblies: FS uniboot fiber patch cable has passed IEC61300-3-35 end-face standard, EIA/TIA-455-171A attenuation standard and CE, etc. providing customers with the outstanding, standards-compliant products and services.

All in One International Quality Cable Assemblies_

  • LC licence compliant & 0.2dB IL: The worldwide licence and low insertion loss keep your network running fast and smooth.

LC Licence Compliant & 0.2dB IL

  • 2.0mm round cable design: 2.0mm thin diameter allows the polarity to be switched from A-B to A-A without any tools.
  • More fiber options: OM3, OM4, and OS2.
  • Space saving: It can save the space of cassettes and cable management by 68%.
How to Achieve Polarity Reversal of LC Uniboot Cable

As we know, for traditional cabling systems using single fiber connectors, maintaining polarity requires that the “A” transmits signal and at the same time the “B” receives signal. But duplex patch cords used to complete serial duplex pair connections available in two types, depending on which polarity technique is used— “A-to-B” patch cord for “straight-through” wiring and “A-to-A” patch cord for “crossover”wiring. Thus, polarity reversal is usually required during fiber optic cabling.

polarity of LC Uniboot Cable

However, polarity reversal of traditional LC patch cable is very inconvenient and annoying since some minor mistakes could lead to various troubles. Therefore, FS.COM developed the LC uniboot cable that is easier for polarity reversal, without having to re-terminate the connectors. Here two methods of polarity reversal are introduced as follows.

LC-uniboot-polarity-reversal

From the above picture, we can see that we can use just 3 steps to reverse polarity. Type one (the left one):

1. Open connector top.

2. Switch the polarity from A-B to A-A.

3. Close connector top.

Type two (the right one):

1. Open connector top.

2. Rotate connector 180 degree to exchange the position.

3. Close connector top.

Summary

To address the increasing demand for high density applications and smaller fiber cable, the LC uniboot fiber patch cable is designed to help cut down cabling space and provide more effective polarity reversal solution. I hope this article could help you choose the proper product for high density cabling. FS.COM not only provides polarity switchable LC fiber patch cable, but also provides bend insensitive fiber patch cable which is also a high density cabling application. Welcome to consult with customer service for more details.

Cat5e VS Cat6 VS Cat7 VS Cat6a: Which One to Choose?

In the era of information explosion, almost everyone can get access to the Internet, and almost everywhere is loaded with network and Ethernet cables. But you may be unaware of the fact that Ethernet cables, though look like the same, actually have different categories. Here, this post will introduce currently available cables in the market (Cat5e, Cat6, Cat6a and Cat7) and compare the differences. May it help with your choice in selecting the appropriate category of cable to support your network.

Cat5e VS Cat6

Both of Cat5e and Cat6 cables are twisted pair cables, performing the same job. They all have the same style RJ-45 plug, and it is capable of plugging into any Ethernet jack on a computer, router, or other similar devices. Despite all the similarities, they do have some differences as shown in the following chart:

Features/Categories Cat5e Cat6
Speed 1000Mbps 10 Gbps over 37-55 meters  of cable
Frequency 100MHz 250 MHz
Maximum Cable Length 100 meters 100 meters for slower network speeds (up to 1,000 Mbps) and higher network speeds over short distances. For Gigabit Ethernet, 55 meters max
Standard Gauges in Conductors 24-26 AWG wire 22-24 AWG wire
Performance Cat6<Cat5e (interference or crosstalk) <Cat5 Lower crosstalk, return loss and insertion loss, higher signal-to-noise ratio

As we can see from the chart, Cat5e (Cat5 Enhanced) offers gigabit Ethernet up to 100 meters, and can support 1000Mbps speeds at 100MHz. Cat6 can provide up to 10 gigabit speeds at 250MHz. Both Cat5e and Cat6 cable allow lengths up to 100 meters, but Cat6 has a lower max length (55 meters) when used for 10GBASE-T. The main difference between Cat5e and Cat6 lies in the transmission performance. Cat6 has an internal separator that lowers interference or near end crosstalk (NEXT). It also improves equal level far end crosstalk (ELFEXT), return loss and insertion loss compared with Cat5e. As a result, Cat6 has a higher signal-to-noise ratio than Cat5e.

Cat6 VS Cat6a VS Cat7

Features/Categories

Cat6

Cat6a

Cat7

Speed

10 Gbps with distance of 37-55 meters

10 Gigabit Ethernet with distance up to 100 meters

10 Gbps with distance up to 100 meters

Connector Type

RJ45

RJ45

GG45

Frequency

250 MHz

500 MHz

600 MHz

Performance

Cat6 (crosstalk) >Cat6a

Cat6>Cat6a (crosstalk) >Cat7

least amount of crosstalk

Standard

TIA/EIA recognition and standards

TIA/EIA recognition and standards

No TIA/EIA recognition

Best Use

households

households

multiple applications or offices

As is shown in this chart, Cat6 supports speeds up to 10 Gigabit Ethernet and frequencies of up to 250 MHz, and can be achieved with distance of 33-55 meters. Cat6a can support bandwidth frequencies of up to 500 MHz, twice the amount of Cat6 cable, and can also support 10Gbps like its predecessor. While Cat7 supports bandwidth frequencies of up to 600 MHz. It also supports 10GBASE-T Ethernet over the full 100 meters like Cat6a. Besides, it features improved crosstalk noise reduction compared to Cat6 and Cat6a. Cat5e, Cat6 and Cat6a are all equipped with RJ45 connectors but Cat7 requires special GigaGate45 (CG45) connectors. The Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) and Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA) have set standards for wires and cabling, which help standardize installation and performance. At this time, Cat6 and Cat6a are recognized by TIA/EIA standards, but Cat7 is not. With respect to best application, Cat6 and Cat6a are suitable for home use. On the contrary, if you’re running multiple applications, or using it in a business environment, you’d better choose Cat7 cables because these can support multiple applications with fewer errors and less crosstalk.

Conclusion

This article reveals some comparisons between Cat5e, Cat6, Cat6a and Cat7, covering speed, frequency, performance, etc. They all have different features, performances and applications. So if you are considering installing Ether cable, be sure to take these factors into consideration, and opt for the one suited to your need most.

Related Article:  What’s the Difference Between Cisco GLC-SX-MM and Cisco GLC-SX-MMD?

OM4 vs. OM5: What’s the Difference?

As the demand for bandwidth, new transmission media must be developed to meet the requirements of users. The latest in optical transmission media is called OM5 fiber. To help you use this advanced fiber to its greatest advantage, this paper describes the basis of OM5 fiber, and highlights the key differences with OM4 fiber.

What Is OM5 Fiber?

According to the ISO/IEC 11801, OM5 fiber specifies a wider range of wavelengths between 850nm and 953nm. It was created to support short wavelength division multiplexing (SWDM), which is one of the many new technologies being developed for transmitting 40Gb/s and 100Gb/s. In June 2016, ANSI/TIA-492AAAE, the new wideband multimode fiber standard, was approved for publication. And in October of 2016, OM5 fiber was announced as the official designation for cabling containing WBMMF (Wide Band Multimode Fiber) by ISO/IEC 11801. From then on, OM5 may be a potential new option for data centers that require greater link distances and higher speeds.

FS OM5-Fiber

What Is OM4 Fiber?

OM4 is laser-optimized 50um fiber having 4.7GHz*km EMB bandwidth designed for 10 Gb/s, 40 Gb/s, and 100 Gb/s transmission. OM4 fiber has been on the market since 2005, sold as premium OM3 or OM3 fiber. The OM4 cable designation standardizes the nomenclature across all manufacturers so that the customer has a clearer idea of the product that they are buying. OM4 fiber is completely backwards compatible with OM3 fiber and shares the same distinctive aqua jacket. OM4 was developed specifically for VSCEL laser transmission and allows 10 Gig/second link distances of up to 550 Meters (compared to 300M with OM3) and offers an Effective Modal Bandwidth (EMB) of 4700 MHz-km.

OM4 vs. OM5: What’s the Difference?

Since OM1 and OM2 fiber can not support 25Gbps and 40Gbps data transmission speeds, OM3 and OM4 were the main choices for multimode fiber to support 25G, 40G and 100G Ethernet. However, it’s becoming more costly for optical fiber cable to support next-generation Ethernet speed migration as bandwidth requirements increase. Against such a background, OM5 fiber was born to extend the benefits of multimode fiber in data centers.

OM4-V.S-OM5

The key difference between them is that EMB is specified only at 850 nm for OM4 fiber at 4700 MHz-km, while OM5 EMB values are specified at both 850 nm and 953 nm and the value at 850 nm is greater than that of OM4. Therefore, OM5 fiber offers users longer length distances and more choices in optical fiber. In addition, TIA has specified lime green as the official cable jacket color for OM5, while OM4 is aqua jacket. And OM4 is designed for 10Gb/s, 40Gb/s, and 100Gb/s transmission, but OM5 is designed for 40Gb/s, and 100Gb/s transmission which reduces the fiber counts for high speed transmissions.

What’s more, OM5 cable can support four SWDM channels, each carrying 25G of data to deliver 100G Ethernet using a single pair of multimode fibers. Besides, it is fully compatible with OM3 and OM4 fiber. OM5 is available globally for installations in multiple enterprise environments, from campuses to buildings to data centers. In a word, OM5 fiber is a better choice than OM4 on transmission distance, speed and cost.

Conclusion

OM5 fiber provides next-generation multimode fiber performance for today and tomorrow’s high speed applications. With its significantly higher bandwidth, it can be assured that multimode fiber will continue to provide the most cost effective solutions for short reach applications in data centers and LANs. OM5 precisely meets the demands, and it will be your preferable choice for your data centers.